Slow Food, founded in 1986, is an international organization whose aim is to protect the pleasures of the table from the homogenization of modern fast food and life. Though a variety of initiatives it promotes gastronomic culture, develops taste education, conserves agricultural biodiversity and protects traditional foods at risk of extinction. It now boasts over 100,000 members in 153 countries.


Slow Food Auckland, formerly Slow Food Waitakere, is registered as a charitable entity. Registration Number: CC38263, please click here to read our Rules and Regulations

Thursday, February 5, 2015

Adopting our Garden in Africa




Help Us Adopt an African Food Garden.

Make a donation to our Slow Food Waitakere African Garden Campaign on Givealittle. 

Slow Food is creating a network of young people working to save Africa's extraordinary biodiversity, to raise the profile of traditional knowledge and food culture and to promote small-scale, family farming.

We plan to to adopt an African school garden that partners with our Auckland school garden project. 
A true local-meets-global connection.

Adopting our African garden costs 900 euro.
So we need to raise $NZ 1,400. 


How the money is used is really cool. It covers the purchase of materials, training for a local team and on-site project coordination, distribution of educational materials and organizing opportunities for exchange among projects. It also includes a contribution towards scholarships for African students to study at the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Italy.

We met some of the inspiring Gardens in Africa team in Turin and we are very keen to support them.
And we will all get to follow the  progress of our garden.

Please jump in and be part of our project!

And share it  with your friends, family and colleagues.

http://givealittle.co.nz/project/10000gardensinafrica2015

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Heirloom + Organic = Biodiversity + Health

Heirloom organic fruits and vegetables typically contain more vitamins, minerals, polyphenols and other health-giving nutrients than conventionally grown modern varieties.

Our ancestors, growing their own food, had good reason to select varieties that most supported their health whereas modern varieties are bred for yield, long shelf life and ability to be transported long distances, not nutrition. Nutritious foods usually taste better.

I still remember the rich combination of tangy and sweet flavours from our Freyberg apple tree as a child – in stark contrast to the bland sweetness of most modern varieties. A typical supermarket has 1 tomato variety and perhaps 3 or 4 apple varieties, mostly very similar. How delicious it would be to be able to choose from dozens of wildly different flavours! Variety is the spice of life!

Older, more nutritious varieties are fast disappearing. We have lost 75% of food crop varieties forever and are still losing 1-2% per year. Multinationals sell mostly hybrid seeds that don't breed true, forcing farmers and gardeners to buy again every year, and are increasingly genetically modified, as they phase out open pollinated varieties. Crop epidemics such as the Irish potato famine force growers to turn to older varieties to find ones that resist pests and diseases. With climate change worsening, we'll increasingly need varieties tolerant of extreme weather too. As these varieties disappear, we become increasingly vulnerable and impoverished.

What you can do: 

Buy heirloom seeds from Koanga Institute (www.koanga.org.nz), especially the rarer varieties.

Grow them, save the seeds and share with friends and neighbours, or join Auckland Seed Savers.

Ask for your favourite heirloom varieties at shops and at farmers markets. If enough people ask, they will start selling them.

David Hodges  Naturopath & Nutritionist specializing in Paleo Diet and gut health. www.aucklandnaturalhealth.com
Member - Slow Food Waitakere 

Check out the Oratia Beauty Heirloom Apple on the  Slow Food Ark of Taste 

The Oratia  Beauty Apple - in season right now!
Buy it at Dragicevich Orchard - 556 West Coast Road


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